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First Ebola case diagnosed in the United States: CDC

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6:39pm EDT

By Julie Steenhuysen and Sharon Begley

(Reuters) - U.S. health officials said on Tuesday the first patient infected with the deadly Ebola virus had been diagnosed in the country after flying from Liberia to Texas, in a new sign of how the outbreak ravaging West Africa can spread globally.

The patient sought treatment six days after arriving in Texas on Sept. 20, Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), told reporters on Tuesday. He was admitted two days later to an isolation room at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.

U.S. health officials and lawmakers have been bracing for the eventuality that a patient would arrive on U.S. shores undetected, testing the preparedness of the nation's healthcare system.

Frieden said a handful of people, mostly family members, may have been exposed to the patient after he fell ill. He said there was likely no threat to any passengers who had traveled with the patient. Asked whether the patient was a U.S. citizen, Frieden described the person as a visitor to family in the country.

"It is certainly possible someone who had contact with this individual could develop Ebola in the coming weeks," Frieden told a news conference. "I have no doubt we will stop this in its tracks in the United States."

The Texas Department of State Health Services said it was working with the CDC, the local health department and the hospital "to investigate the case and help prevent transmission of the disease."

"The hospital has implemented infection control measures to help ensure the safety of patients and staff," the statement said.

U.S. hospitals have treated several patients who were diagnosed with Ebola in West Africa, the center of the worst known outbreak of the virus that has killed more than 3,000 people. The previous U.S. patients were all medical and other aid workers who were diagnosed while overseas and flown to the country in a specially outfitted airplane.

Frieden has said U.S. hospitals are well prepared to handle Ebola patients and has assured the public that the virus should not pose the same threat in the United States as it does in Africa.

Ebola symptoms generally appear between two and 21 days after infection, meaning there is a significant window during which an infected person can escape detection, allowing them to travel. Frieden emphasized that Ebola cannot be spread through the air but only through contact with bodily fluids such as blood, diarrhea and tears.

He said that CDC and other health officials were discussing whether to treat the Ebola patient with an experimental drug for the virus, without specifying which one might be considered. Treatments from Mapp Biopharmaceutical and Tekmira Pharmaceuticals Corp have been used to treat a small number of patients so far in the outbreak.

Stocks in Tekmira and other small biotechnology companies working on Ebola therapies or vaccines rose on the news of the U.S. Ebola patient in after-hours trading.

(Reporting by Julie Steenhuysen in Chicago and Sharon Begley in New York; Editing by Michele Gershberg and Lisa Shumaker)

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Again, because of a failure to follow the Biblical example of quarantining those with infectious  diseases so many will die as this new plague spreads across the globe.

They as may play the Blue Oyster cult 24/7:

Consider this, because there has been no effective quarantine, this one they have detected out of how many?

U.S. experts hunt for Ebola exposure after first case


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2:10pm EDT

By Susan Heavey


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Health experts are monitoring "a handful" of people who were potentially exposed to Ebola through physical contact with the first patient diagnosed with the deadly virus in the United States, the top U.S. public health official said on Wednesday.


Health officials confirmed the first case of the virus in the country on Tuesday, when a man who flew from Liberia to Texas tested positive for Ebola, which has killed more than 3,000 people in three countries in West Africa.


Texas health officials said healthcare workers have tested negative for the virus and there are no other suspected cases in the state. The healthcare workers will be closely monitored for the next 21 days, the time it can take for symptoms of the hemorrhagic fever to appear.


"We have a seven-person team in Dallas today helping to review that with the family and make sure we identify everyone that could have had contact with him," Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said in an interview with NBC TV's "Today" show.


Officials were looking at family members the patient visited and healthcare providers who helped treat him, which amounted to "a handful" of people, according to Frieden.


The patient was in serious condition, a Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital spokeswoman said on Wednesday. The man was admitted on Sunday, and the hospital did not describe his condition at the time of Tuesday's announcement that he had Ebola.


The patient was evaluated initially last Friday and sent home with antibiotics, a critical missed opportunity that could result in others being exposed to the virus, infectious disease experts said.


Ebola spreads through contact with bodily fluids like blood or saliva, which health experts say limits its potential to infect others, unlike airborne diseases. Still, the long window of time before patients exhibit signs of infection, such as fever, vomiting and diarrhea, means an infected person can travel without detection.


The virus can be fatal. While past outbreaks killed as many as 90 percent of victims, the current outbreak has an average fatality rate of about 50 percent.


The patient in the United States, who was not identified for privacy reasons, arrived in Texas on Sept. 20, and first sought treatment six days later, according to the CDC.


The Liberian government said that the man showed no signs of fever or other symptoms of Ebola when he left Liberia on Sept. 19. A Liberian official said the man traveled through Brussels to the United States.


On Wednesday, officials repeated a call to healthcare workers to be vigilant in screening patients in the United States for possible signs of the virus.


"If you have someone who's been in West Africa in the past 21 days and they've got a fever or other symptoms that might be consistent with Ebola, immediately isolate them, get them tested," Frieden told NBC.


Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, said on CNN that emergency room personnel should get information on patients' travel history if they show possible symptoms, calling it "an enormous red flag."


U.S. health authorities have said every step was being taken to ensure Ebola does not spread widely in the United States and have expressed confidence that it can be contained. Frieden briefed President Barack Obama on Tuesday and they discussed isolation protocols.


"People can be confident here in this country that we have the medical infrastructure in place to prevent the broad spread of Ebola," White House spokesman Josh Earnest said on CNN.


Shares of a number of drugmakers with Ebola treatments in the pipeline rose on Wednesday, and airline stocks and hotel company shares dropped over concerns that worries about Ebola might hurt travel.


Some health experts have said that, given the information from the CDC so far, a widespread outbreak in the United States appears unlikely from this single case. They note that doctors, nurses and other healthcare providers routinely use gloves, masks and gowns when examining patients.


Tom Solomon, an emerging infections expert at the University of Liverpool in Britain, said "the chances of it becoming established in America or other Western countries is very small."


Meanwhile, World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, the first public health expert to lead the institution, said fighting Ebola means confronting inequality, as people in poor countries have less access to knowledge and infrastructure for treating the sick and containing it.


(Additional reporting by Jon Herskovitz in Austin, Ian Simpson and Doina Chiacu in Washington and Franklin Paul in New York; Editing by Bernadette Baum and Grant McCool)

© Thomson Reuters 2014. All rights reserved. Users may download and print extracts of content from this website for their own personal and non-commercial use only. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters and its logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of the Thomson Reuters group of companies around the world.

Thomson Reuters journalists are subject to an Editorial Handbook which requires fair presentation and disclosure of relevant interests.

I heard the usual bureaucratic platitudes and lies on the News.  The official count just got ratcheted up to 11 today.  That was after the "we have it contained, only one guy speech."

Parents rushed to get their children from school Wednesday after learning that five students may have had contact with the Ebola patient in a Dallas hospital, as Gov. Rick Perry and other leaders reassured the public that there is no cause for alarm.

The patient, identified by The Associated Press as Thomas Eric Duncan of Liberia, arrived in the U.S. on Sept. 20 to visit family. Dallas County Health and Human Services Director Zachary Thompson said county officials suspect that 12 to 18 people may have had contact with Duncan.http://www.star-telegram.com/2014/10/01/6165611/officials-say-only-...

Welcome to the new Bubonic Plague of the 21st Century.  It had no cure then either, and 3/4's of the world died.

 

Ebola outbreak: Texas checks 100 for exposure

As many as 100 people in Texas are being checked for exposure to Ebola, health officials have said.

The list includes "potential or possible contacts" with Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian national diagnosed in Dallas on Tuesday, and "will drop".

Four of his relatives have been ordered to stay home while they are watched for signs of the disease, officials say.

Mr Duncan, believed to have caught the disease in Liberia, is in a serious condition in hospital.

He was the first case diagnosed on US soil.

In West Africa more than 3,338 have died in the world's worst outbreak of the virus.

There have been 7,178 confirmed cases, with Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea suffering the most.

Leading charity Save the Children has warned that Ebola was spreading at a "terrifying rate", with the number of new recorded cases doubling every few weeks.

UK Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond has called for urgent decisive action, including more financial aid, doctors and nurses, from the international community at a conference in London.

'Strict order'

In Texas on Thursday, Department of State Health Services spokeswoman Carrie Williams described the department's list of 100 people as "a very wide net" of individuals "who have had even brief encounters with the patient or the patient's home".

"The number will drop as we focus in on those whose contact may represent a potential risk of infection," she said.

Health commissioner Dr David Lakey said four of Mr Duncan's "close relatives" had been ordered to stay home and not receive visitors until 19 October.

"We have tried and true protocols to protect the public and stop the spread of this disease," Dr Lakey said. "This order gives us the ability to monitor the situation in the most meticulous way."

His office said Mr Duncan's relatives had previously been instructed to stay at home, but a "strict public health control order is needed to ensure compliance".

Texas health officials have said that only 12-18 people are known to have had direct contact with Mr Duncan.

That includes five children who have been told to stay home from school.

Initial hospital visit

The disease, which is not contagious until symptoms appear, is spread via close contact with bodily fluids.

Mr Duncan is thought to have contracted the virus in Liberia before he travelled to the US nearly two weeks ago to visit relatives.

He sought medical attention at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital on 25 September. Then hospital officials said he had a low-grade fever and abdominal pain. Basic blood tests were performed, but he was not screened for the Ebola virus.

A nurse asked Mr Duncan if he had travelled from Africa, and he said he had, but that information was not fully communicated to the medical staff, an oversight the hospital now says it "regrets".

Do we know how Mr Duncan was infected?

It is believed he came into contact with Marthalene Williams, an Ebola infected woman in Liberia on 15 September, according to a report by the New York Times.

Mr Duncan is said to have helped take her to hospital, but she was later turned away due to lack of space in the Ebola treatment ward. He helped to carry her home, where she died hours later.

Williams's brother, Sonny Boy, also later displayed symptoms of Ebola and died en route to a local hospital.

How did the Ebola virus get into the US?

Mr Duncan was given antibiotics and a pain reliever and sent home, where his condition worsened, says his sister.

On 28 September, a friend of Mr Duncan's contacted the CDC for advice and was instructed to call the Texas Department of Health, which sent an ambulance.

The diagnosis was confirmed on 30 September.

Ebola virus disease (EVD)

  • Symptoms include high fever, bleeding and central nervous system damage
  • Spread by body fluids, such as blood and saliva
  • Fatality rate can reach 90% - but current outbreak has mortality rate of about 70%
  • Incubation period is two to 21 days
  • There is no proven vaccine or cure
  • Supportive care such as rehydrating patients who have diarrhoea and vomiting can help recovery
  • Fruit bats, a delicacy for some West Africans, are considered to be virus's natural host

    Ebola virus: Busting the myths

"How did the Ebola virus get into the US?

Mr Duncan was given antibiotics and a pain reliever and sent home, where his condition worsened, says his sister.

On 28 September, a friend of Mr Duncan's contacted the CDC for advice and was instructed to call the Texas Department of Health, which sent an ambulance."

My opinion is that it has to do with political correctness.   It would not be politically correct to block citizens from traveling in or out of an African nation. 

Ebola threatens political amnesty in the USA by showing the need for common sense control at the borders. No political amnesty and no new democrat voters.  

It got into the United States, because flights from infected countries were not quarantined and kept out.  If that had been done, there would not be a problem in the first place.  Our leaders failed us.

We can bust the Ebola myths all day long but 3 things. Doctors who were careful and all "suited" up caught it.  The government does not have our best interests in mind and politicizes everything and if Ebola ever got into a day care or elementary school, it would be bad because day-cares are the vector and spread of most sickness known to adults.  Kids get it, parents, and then grand parents who have to watch the sick kids so they do not spread it back to the kids in day care.  

They were scrubbing down an elementary school in Dallas just the other day, because Duncan took his infected butt all over the place.  He has family members in quarantine (ironic) in their apartment complex.  The news said they were not "legally" allowed to leave.  Are they going to get a fine if they do?

There is a small degree of separation between people in the world.  Duncan took his diseased butt on an aircraft exposing everyone on board.  They in turn exposed everyone they knew, and so son.  Then he went to a hospital, exposed the people in the waiting room, and by extension everyone they knew, and so on.  Then he was handled by doctors, nurses, and staff, and then everyone they encountered that shift and everyone they knew..  Then after exposing his family members and the entire apartment complex and everyone they knew (including an elementary school) he was hauled away in an ambulance and exposed the EMT's, and everyone that went into that ambulance and everyone they encountered and knew that day.  Then another hospital exposure, and finally (ironically) put into quarantine .

Now, there is yet another confirmed case in Washington D.C. today.  Similar scenario.

So, if our executive had a hair on his manhood, or a care for the citizens of the country, there would have been a quarantine on any flight coming in from infected areas of Africa.  He didn't.  He doesn't.  So, here we are with bodies on the deck and more coming.

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