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Narcissistic Personality Disorder vs Borderline Personality Disorder

Borderline Personality Disorder vs. Narcissistic Personality Disorder:  How are They Different

Though the two personality disorders share some common symptoms, they are distinct disorders with their own set of diagnostic criteria. For example, both BPD and NPD deal with conflict in a way that is unhealthy to themselves and those around them. It’s the expression of the anger that results from the conflict that is different.

Symptoms of Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Just like Borderline Personality Disorder, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) lists nine symptoms of Narcissistic Personality Disorder. If you exhibit five of these nine symptoms in a persistent manner, you meet the criteria for diagnosis of NPD:

  • An exaggerated sense of one’s own abilities and achievements
  • A constant need for attention, affirmation, and praise
  • A belief that you are unique or “special,” and should only associate with other people of the same status
  • Persistent fantasies about attaining success and power
  • Exploiting other people for personal gain
  • A sense of entitlement and expectation of special treatment
  • A preoccupation with power or success
  • Feeling envious of others, or believing that others are envious of you
  • A lack of empathy for others

NPD and BPD: Similarities and Differences

Narcissistic Personality Disorder can exist on its own, but can also be found co-occurring with Borderline Personality Disorder. Mix and match five out of nine symptoms of NPD with five out of the nine symptoms of BPD, and you get someone who will likely be described at least as “difficult” or “high maintenance,” and who certainly is having a tough time in day-to-day life.

Both people with BPD and with NPD deal with an intense fear of abandonment. Enhancing that fear of abandonment is the fact that sustaining relationships with others in the face of these symptoms is a challenge to say the least. “Intense and stormy relationships” is, in fact, one of the characterizing symptoms of BPD.

In an article for Psychology Today, Susan Heitler, PhD, author and Harvard graduate, describes emotionally healthy functioning in the absence of BPD or NPD: “Emotionally healthy functioning is characterized by ability to hear your own concerns, thoughts, and feelings and also to be responsive to others’ concerns.”

In the world of the narcissist, that second part just isn’t present. Narcissists are unable to step outside of themselves to imagine any weight behind someone else’s opinion. This renders someone with NPD socially and emotionally ineffective, and affects their ability to maintain relationships.

Definition

The hallmarks of Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) are grandiosity, a lack of empathy for other people, and a need for admiration. People with this condition are frequently described as arrogant, self-centered, manipulative, and demanding. They may also concentrate on grandiose fantasies (e.g. their own success, beauty, brilliance) and may be convinced that they deserve special treatment. These characteristics typically begin in early adulthood and must be consistently evident in multiple contexts, such as at work and in relationships. 

People with narcissistic personality disorder believe they are superior or special, and often try to associate with other people they believe are unique or gifted in some way. This association enhances their self-esteem, which is typically quite fragile underneath the surface. Individuals with NPD seek excessive admiration and attention in order to know that others think highly of them. Individuals with narcissistic personality disorder have difficulty tolerating criticism or defeat, and may be left feeling humiliated or empty when they experience an "injury" in the form of criticism or rejection. 

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The hallmarks of Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) are grandiosity, a lack of empathy for other people, and a need for admiration. People with this condition are frequently described as arrogant, self-centered, manipulative, and demanding.They may also concentrate on grandiose fantasies (e.g. their own success, beauty, brilliance) and may be convinced that they deserve special treatment. These characteristics typically begin in early adulthood and must be consistently evident in multiple contexts, such as at work and in relationships.

People with narcissistic personality disorder believe they are superior or special, and often try to associate with other people they believe are unique or gifted in some way. This association enhances their self-esteem, which is typically quite fragile underneath the surface. Individuals with NPD seek excessive admiration and attention in order to know that others think highly of them. Individuals with narcissistic personality disorder have difficulty tolerating criticism or defeat, and may be left feeling humiliated or empty when they experience an "injury" in the form of criticism or rejection.

clear case

suggested treatment 

Treatment for narcissistic personality disorder can be challenging because people with this condition present with a great deal of grandiosity and defensiveness, which makes it difficult for them to acknowledge problems and vulnerabilities. Individual and group psychotherapy may be useful in helping people with narcissistic personality disorder relate to others in a healthier and more compassionate way. Mentalization-based therapy, transference-focused psychotherapy, and schema-focused psychotherapy have all been suggested as effective ways of treating narcissistic personality disorder.

 but the only true treatment is Jesus

Jason I did not know that there was a name for that sort of disorder of the mind. The diagnosis does clearly fit on that person. But do you think that is anything we can do to help?

Who are you talking about? Are either of you a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist?

Are you Lindy? I did not know you had to be qualified to talk about something? 

In order for a person to be diagnosed with narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) they must meet five or more of the following  symptoms:

DSM-5 criteria for narcissistic personality disorder include these features:

  • Having an exaggerated sense of self-importance
  • Expecting to be recognized as superior even without achievements that warrant it
  • Exaggerating your achievements and talents
  • Being preoccupied with fantasies about success, power, brilliance, beauty or the perfect mate
  • Believing that you are superior and can only be understood by or associate with equally special people
  • Requiring constant admiration
  • Having a sense of entitlement
  • Expecting special favors and unquestioning compliance with your expectations
  • Taking advantage of others to get what you want
  • Having an inability or unwillingness to recognize the needs and feelings of others
  • Being envious of others and believing others envy you
  • Behaving in an arrogant or haughty manner

Read the comments here and see someone who, when someone agrees with him, says wonderful things about them,, but when someone disagrees with his beliefs (which are almost always false) cast out spells and curses them 

The above could be applied to you, Elijah, as well as to other SDA's who think as you do that you have a corner on the market for God. You speak as though you are an expert, you have no experience of speaking in tongues whatsoever. To whom are you and Jason disgnosing as NPD?
Why are you referring to someone here un-named? I called you both certain individuals, thoigh it's obvious who I am referring to, and that you are referring to me.

Many people do not like your attitude and unreasonable manners. You make false assumptions and judgments, and make mockings of the spirit, do you not know that is blasphemy? If you don't want to speak in tongues, that's your business, but when you call me and the spirit of God and the manifestations demonic, then it becomes God's and my business.

Accusing people of mental illness and having demons falsely is evil, and a sin, especially in my case having already defending my mother and I in court against false charges on almost a weekly basis for years, including false accusation of mental illness by my own flesh and blood.

DO YOU UNDERSTAND?

I'm not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist.  But, I have worked with kids that had mental disabilities. I personally think the Goldwater Rule should apply to everyone not just physicians.  I also find the thread distasteful.  

The kids I worked with were mixed in with a diversified group of children.  Even the ones that would act out uncontrollable and cause me difficulties I would never intentionally openly discus their conditions for the purpose of singling them out.

God is the cure for all problems.  You shouldn't need a diagnosis just to prescribe him, better yet allow Jesus example to guide your behavior so that you can help those around you

Thank you Rabbittroup. It is very evil and hurtful. I got upset and angry for cause. I don't look for trouble. You are sensible and cocsiderate and fair it seems, and you tried to smooth things out between the combatants. I will no longer address them unless compelled to by God. I leave them to their own devices, and let God sort it out.
Rabbittroup:

I don't believe Elijah or JasonM are trained, educated and licensed to legally diagnose physical or mental diseases. Most if not all of the psychiatric diseases have no verifiable objective and repeatable test for the diseases. It is all opinions and theories and "beliefs." Science does not generally accept spiritual matters or things, only materialism.

There is no test for chemical imbalance of the brain. This construct was created by psychiatry to keep their careers and the money rolling in at what $350 an hour or whatever. That was necessary because psychiatry was discredited and losing credibility. I personally saw someone I love seriously damaged by psychiatric experimentation ( every time they use drugs, it's experimenting; practicing).

You worked in the field, I hope you don't take offense of my opinions about general psychiatry?

So even licensed psychiatrists are questionable?

The only psychiatrists I would have any confidence in is Townsend and Cloud, who are authors and Christians.

James I really don't like this thread. It is not a good thread but you are making the assumption that it is about you. I don't think it is. It is about another person, which again is not a good thing.

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