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Six years have passed since I learned about Seventh-day Adventist Sunday keeping in the Pacific Islands, which is officially sanctioned by the church.
We have tried to get leaders to revisit the issue but they will not, right from Ted Wilson.
How can it be corrected?

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Jason I am not sure what you mean by being a "fact" Burnside is using words very cleverly. Never the less it is not Burnside who has authority over the Dateline. It is as far as I understand the civil government. This is no only Tonga who had this question to deal with other Pacific islands also had the dateline changed and are keeping Sabbath on a Sunday fully sanctioned by the SPD. Do you think that as long as the Division sanctions the compromise it is blessed by God? I do not think so, because God is not mocked. 

WELL, IF THEY REST 6 DAYS AND TAKE ONE OFF THEN THAT IS THEIR SABBATH I GUESS. IN LEVITICUS THERE ARE OTHER DAYS OF THE WEEK WHICH ARE ALSO CALLED SABBATH, THE WORD IMPLIES, REST.

Jason, I have the book in my library. You should buy one. It’s available. Interesting that the book by GC historian, Robert Leo Odom, The Lord’s Day On A Round World, was revised and reissued in 1970. I’d like to know if it was in response to Bain’s book
Rick, are you saying there’s no real point for the existence of the Seventh-day Adventist Church?

The International Date Line, established in 1884, passes through the mid-Pacific Ocean and roughly follows a 180 degrees longitude north-south line on the Earth. It is located halfway round the world from the prime meridian—the zero degrees longitude established in Greenwich, England, in 1852.

The International Date Line functions as a “line of demarcation” separating two consecutive calendar dates. When you cross the date line, you become a time traveler of sorts! Cross to the west and it’s one day later; cross back and you’ve “gone back in time."

Despite its name, the International Date Line has no legal international status and countries are free to choose the dates that they observe. While the date line generally runs north to south from pole to pole, it zigzags around political borders such as eastern Russia and Alaska’s Aleutian Islands.

https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/international-date-line.html 

Very good. So the question is, what authority does the SDA Church, or any other church, to defy the date that the country chooses?
The Burnside article cleverly uses the nautical dateline (always the 180 meridian) when it doesn’t apply on land. When a ship docks it always complies with local time but if it is at sea it changes dates at the 180. The Adventist Church had no right to claim that the 180 is the true dateline. This is all pure butt covering after the error our pioneer missionaries made.
Weekly, we appeal to members to repent of our sins and turn from them but as a corporate body, we have been inventing excuses and refusing to admit any mistake for over a century

Greeting John,

I have never heard of Seventh-Day Adventist Sunday before but I have done a little research on it and I believe that countries should work with the own time seeing that the time varies from country to country and I believe why it is so is because the sun sets at different time in different areas of the would.

Therefore I would encourage the worshipers to act according the time of the country/when the sun sets and rises. 

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